A Classic Drink From New Orleans

Sazerac Cocktail

  • Ice
  • Sugar cube
  • Peychaud's Bitters
  • Sazerac Rye Whiskey
  • Herbsaint
  • Lemon twist
  1. Pack an old-fashioned glass with ice.
  2. Put the sugar cube in a second old-fashioned glass, add three dashes of Peychaud's Bitters, then crush the sugar.
  3. Add one and a half ounces whiskey to the same glass.
  4. Empty ice out of the first glass, coat the inside with Herbsaint, and pour out any remaining liquor.
  5. Add ice to the glass with the whiskey-bitters mixture and stir. Strain into the Herbsaint-rinsed glass.
  6. Rub the lemon twist around the rim of the glass and serve.

At The Bar

A Classic Drink From New Orleans

Bar owners everywhere have long understood: If you attract women to your establishment, men will follow. Which is why, in 1949, Seymour Weiss—owner of the famed Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans—decided to end the policy of only allowing women into his prestigious hotel bar once a year. He proclaimed that they could come every day. And they did—to a place he called The Sazerac Bar.

A century earlier, in 1850, there was a Sazerac Coffee House in the French Quarter, where bartenders began mixing local Peychaud's Bitters with sugar and Sazerac-de-Forge et Fils cognac. The cocktail—named for the coffeehouse—was an instant hit across the city, with some alterations as the years went by. Most notably, Sazerac lovers switched from cognac to rye whiskey and started rinsing the glass with absinthe, which some recipes later replaced with Herbsaint. The unofficial "drink of New Orleans" was born.

Or at least that's the tale that bartenders will tell you from behind the bar at today's The Roosevelt New Orleans, A Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The Sazerac Bar, restored to its old glory, is still coed—and the Sazeracs served there are, as you might expect, always precisely prepared. Try the official recipe at left—and the next time you're in town, stop by The Sazerac Bar to sample the real thing.

Sazerac mixers.

Calling all mixologists: Learn the secrets of legendary cocktails by visiting Waldorf Astoria on Pinterest. pinterest.com/waldorfastoria

Sazerac Cocktail

  • Ice
  • Sugar cube
  • Peychaud's Bitters
  • Sazerac Rye Whiskey
  • Herbsaint
  • Lemon twist
  1. Pack an old-fashioned glass with ice.
  2. Put the sugar cube in a second old-fashioned glass, add three dashes of Peychaud's Bitters, then crush the sugar.
  3. Add one and a half ounces whiskey to the same glass.
  4. Empty ice out of the first glass, coat the inside with Herbsaint, and pour out any remaining liquor.
  5. Add ice to the glass with the whiskey-bitters mixture and stir. Strain into the Herbsaint-rinsed glass.
  6. Rub the lemon twist around the rim of the glass and serve.

“Hurricanes are for tourists; Sazeracs are for natives.”

New Orleans wisdom
Pouring a glass.

Table
For Two

by Diana Anderson

In any relationship, there are varying degrees of romance. Sharing a table at your favorite restaurant is thoughtful. But having a restaurant re-created in the privacy of your hotel suite—now that's romantic. And it happens all the time at Waldorf Astoria Orlando, where the iconic Bull & Bear restaurant turns your hotel suite into the best seat in the house.

"It's one of our most popular offerings for couples who want a more intimate, exclusive setting," says Anna Schell, in-room dining manager. The restaurant comes to you, from the candles to the Bull & Bear china to the server who presents your multi-course meal. Guests can choose from an array of chef Daniel Tederous's specialties, or make custom requests.

After dinner, couples can watch the nightly fireworks from their suite while sipping a vintage cognac and sampling Waldorf Astoria beignets.

Bull And Bear